Archive | Video

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Remembering ’89: Yesterday and Today

Posted on 22 December 2009 by admin

In September 2009 in Bratislava, Transitions Online and the CEE Trust hosted Social Innovation Camp Central and Eastern Europe. This three-day event brought together Web developers, designers, and civil-society actors from seven post-communist countries and formed them into teams to build effective online solutions to real social  problems.

During the camp, TOL executive director Jeremy Druker asked several of the participants to share their memories of the 1989 revolutions and their thoughts about their societies today.

Remembering ’89: Yesterday and Today from Transitions Online on Vimeo.

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Communism Redux

Posted on 26 November 2009 by admin

By Meagan Sneesby/Argus

Katerina Konecna

Konecna

On 28 November 1989, in the face of a peaceful mass revolt, the Czechoslovak Communist Party announced it would give up its constitutional monopoly on power.  Two decades on, its successor, the Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia, is the third-most popular party in the Czech Republic and has been gaining in recent polls at the expense of the mainstream parties, the left-wing Social Democrats and the center-right Civic Democrats.

Though still reviled by much of the public, the Communists wield sufficient support to likely prevent either of the leading parties from forming a stable parliamentary majority in next year’s elections. With young leaders such as MP Katerina Konecna, elected to parliament in 2002 at age 21, at the forefront, the party is working to burnish its image and expand beyond its elderly base, downplaying its association with 40 years of totalitarian rule and claiming a commitment to the values of democratic socialism. In this video report from the Argus, an online magazine produced by students in the ePhotojournalism program at Australia’s Griffith University, Konecna and other modern Communists talk about the party’s platform and its place in today’s Czech Republic.

Click here to learn more about the Argus’ Velvet Revolution anniversary project and view other videos about the post-communist Czech experience.

20 YEARS AFTER:Communism Redux from MeaganSneesby on Vimeo.

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Remembering ’89: Robert Troska

Posted on 19 November 2009 by admin

Robert Troska was born in Prague on May 1, 1930. A veteran of various technical and industrial fields, he worked during the communist era at the state Research Institute of Technology and at Czechoslovak Television. In 1992 he founded the industrial consultancy RITMO and remains its managing director. In this interview with TOL contributor Sarah Kunkler, he offers his view of the Czech Republic’s bumpy transition to private enterprise and a market economy.

Remembering ’89: Robert Troska from Transitions Online on Vimeo.

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21st-Century Czech

Posted on 16 November 2009 by admin

By Elizabeth Walters/Argus

What does it mean to be Czech today, two decades after the collapse of communism? That was the question posed on summer day to people strolling through the Franciscan Gardens in central Prague. In this video report from the Argus, an online magazine produced by students in the ePhotojournalism program at Australia’s Griffith University, Czechs from a variety of age groups and walks of life reflect on the state of their lives and their country in 2009.

Click here to learn more about the Argus’ Velvet Revolution anniversary project and view other videos about the post-communist Czech experience.

CZECHS IN THE 21ST CENTURY from Liz Walters on Vimeo.


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Remembering ’89: Nicole Wowesna-Trhlinova

Posted on 16 November 2009 by admin

Nicole Wowesna-Trhlinova was 7 when Czechoslovakia’s communist regime was swept away by an onslaught of peaceful protest. Today she lives in the Prague suburb of Hostivice and works in the public-relations department for the state air-traffic-control service. In an interview with TOL contributor Sarah Kunkler, Nicole recalls seeing the revolution through a child’s eyes.

Remembering ’89: Nicole Wowesna-Trhlinova from Transitions Online on Vimeo.

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Remembering ’89: Jiri Zidek

Posted on 09 November 2009 by admin

Entering the autumn of 1989 Jiri Zidek was 16 years old, seven feet tall, and a budding fixture with the Sparta Prague and Czechoslovak national basketball teams. That seemed the likely upper limit of his athletic career – a star at home, barely known abroad, glimpsed in (and getting glimpses of) the West in international and club competitions, following in the footsteps of his hoops-playing dad, Jiri Sr.

November 1989 changed all that. Two years after the fall of the Berlin Wall and the Prague demonstrations in which he took part, Zidek was a freshman at UCLA, one of the most storied programs in American college basketball. In 1995, as UCLA’s starting center, he became the first (and to date only) Czech to play on a U.S. college basketball champion; he went on to become the first of his countrymen to make the NBA and to win a Euroleague title (with Lithuania’s Zalgiris Kaunas in 1999).

In 2003 Zidek returned to the Czech Republic and won two national league titles with the Nymburk squad before retiring due to knee trouble in 2006. Now 36, he works in the front office at Nymburk, where he talked to TOL contributor Lucie Kavanova about the heady days of November 1989 and the way they changed the trajectory of his life.

Remembering ’89: Jiri Zidek from Transitions Online on Vimeo.

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Timisoara protests – ‘Viva Tokes!’

Posted on 26 October 2009 by admin

Photo and video documentary of the mounting demonstrations in Timisoara, Romania, in December over the communist regime’s attempt to silence dissident minister Laszlo Tokes by transferring him to a remote village parish. The movement spread to Bucharest, spelling the end for dictator Nicolae Ceausescu.

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Bulgaria’s revolutionary rock heroes

Posted on 05 October 2009 by admin

Shturcite (The Crickets) has been Bulgaria’s most popular rock band since the late 1960s. Their 1990 song “Az sym prosto Chovek” (“I’m Only Human”) became an anthem of the country’s democratic movement, and songwriter/frontman Kiril Marichkov served in the Bulgarian parliament.

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End of the Ceausescus

Posted on 04 October 2009 by admin

Nicolae and Elena Ceausescu meet their demise.

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Muslim demonstration, Sofia, 1989

Posted on 04 October 2009 by admin

Muslims  demonstrate in Sofia for recognition of their Turkish names, which were forcibly Bulgarianized by the Communist regime. The new government acceded to the demand on 29 December 1989

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